Skip to main content

About your Search

20130115
20130123
STATION
KQED (PBS) 19
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jan 22, 2013 3:00pm PST
of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms >> ifill: the calls to action drew cheers from the hundreds of thousands of well wishers on the national mall and from most democrats. but republicans complained of a defiant tone and a sharply left ward turn, noting, for example, that the president has mentioned the deficit just once. the super pac cross roads g.p.s. unveiled a web video citing news accounts of the speech. >> the progressive liberal agenda is what he's now clearly staking his second term on. >> ifill: and at the capital today, republican senate minority leader mitch mcconnell joined the criticism >> one thing that pretty clear from the president's speech yesterday, the era of liberalism is back. unabashedly far left of center inauguration speech certainly brings back memories of the democratic party of ages past. if the president pursues that kind of agenda, obviously it's not designed to bring us together and certainly not designed to deal with the transcendent issue of our era which is deficit and debt. unti
PBS
Jan 15, 2013 2:30pm PST
is on to get it, i use it and sell it. >> a science fair in manchester and excitement about the revolutionary material graph scene. manchester has pioneered asearch into gradsteiphine, material so thin, it has just a single layer of atoms and many potential uses. >> you can take it and throwing out the window and it will not/. >> it is strange. >> it is contained in the tiny black flecks on this tape. it has been called a wonder material because it is destined to be incredibly useful. let's use virtual reality to get a closer look at this stuff, because it has extraordinary properties. if you scratch it, it turns out to be stronger than steel or even diamonds down at the same scale, useful for making all kinds of things more robust. it conducts electricity better than copper, vital for future electronics. you could have a computer screen that you could fold up like paper. no wonder people are talking of graphine as a material that could revolutionize the way we make things. this promotional video from samsung shows one view of the kind of gadgets but could emerge. paper thin, flexible, three-
PBS
Jan 14, 2013 6:00pm PST
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: battle lines were drawn at either end of pennsylvania avenue today over the national debt and government spending. the opening shots came from president obama at his white house news conference. >> i thought it might make sense to take some questions this week as my first term comes to an end. >> brown: the questions were dominated by the looming debt ceiling fight. the president sternly warned republicans not to balk at raising the nation's borrowing limit. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. and they better choo
PBS
Jan 21, 2013 7:00pm PST
. the things that we have to fix are the basics. they're not hard, they're not rocket science, but we just have to achieve consensus. my optimism comes from the fact that historically america has been willing to face the hard problems, be dynamic, change things, not get stuck in gridlock. right now it's unsettling how unabler two make progress. but i thi there's an underlying optimism i have that just because of the very historical nature of this country and certainly there's no reason why we can't be competitive. you know, it's really going to be our choice in terms of how we behave, what kind of policies we set, how we work together between business and government and, you know, i'm optimistic that we'll sort it out but, boy, it sure looks ugly right now. >> susie: for more on michaelportier's research and articles go to nbr.com and check out our partnership with some of the nation's top business schools like harvard. >> tom: while beer wasn't invented in america, u.s. brewers are thinking small to make it big. small craft brewers are claiming a bigger stake of the industry's annual $300 bill
PBS
Jan 20, 2013 5:00pm PST
people can't see the dot on the horizon that you see? >> we associate utopia with science fiction showing those visions gone wrong. we associate utopia with how we perceive communism, especially soviet communism. because utopia has been so discredited, so dragged through the mud politically, especially during the years of the cold war, that anyone who speaks in that language is dismissed in one form or another. >> would you call frederick douglas utopian? barack obama utopian? >> frederick douglas, i imagine, was like the other abolitioni s abolitionists, regarded as dabbling in dreams. and would have been dismissed as a dreamer, or worse, a fraud. because when his first autobiography came out, when the narrative came out, many people questioned whether he had written it himself. it was impossible that a slave could have written these words. it must have been one of his abolitionist friends, one of his white abolitionist friends. it must have been garrison, et cetera. well, it turns out that, indeed, douglas wrote those words. >> do you feel the same way four years later about that momen
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 12:00am PST
in history and i think people who sort of follow the science of sport realized that is anything but the case but this is a system with a massive, massive number of false negatives and very few false positives and if you are really trying hard and have a lot of resources then you shouldn't fail the test. me and a colleague lena roberts reported last year he also had people in the anti-doping labs helping him figure out how to skip by those tests you should never fail if you have that kind of test. >> i mean, when you look at what he has done, what is is the reaction of his friends, those people closest to him? >> anybody talk to them? >> well, it is an interesting place, because knows are the people that get forgotten, especially the x friends, i know he reached out to half a dozen people who were harmed the most, this is not a story about lying, as the story about protecting the lie by viciously attacking other people who can't fight back, attacking with lawyers and powers and all means necessary that lance attacks but reached out over the last few days, i think a couple of conversations hav
PBS
Jan 15, 2013 3:00pm PST
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. students targeted in syria. a massive explosion shakes aleppo. moret than 80 people are reportedly killed. lance armstrong opens up to oprah winfrey about doping. she says h
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 3:00pm PST
. that's the subject of a new book by paul dickson. and on our science page, see how hip hop and the pillsbury doughboy helped a group of fifth graders learn math. how do we work on making social security solvent? economist jared bernstein offers a menu of choices on making sense. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. ray? >> suarez: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, we'll update the kidnapping of americans and other foreigners in algeria. i'm ray suarez. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadca
PBS
Jan 17, 2013 3:00pm PST
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: algeria's state news agency now says special forces have completed a mission to rescue dozens of foreign hostages, including some americans. they'd been held by militants tied to al-qaeda. but there are wildly varying accounts of how many got out alive, and how many were killed. >> because of the fluidity and the fact that there is a lot of planning going on, i cannot give you any further details at this time about the current situation on the ground. >> brown: even this afternoon, as secretary of state hillary clinton suggested, the situation in algeria remained confused. the focus was this natural gas compound in the sahara desert seen here in footage from last month. the vast, natu
PBS
Jan 18, 2013 3:00pm PST
poison at "lunch in the lab." plus, tell us what you think of our science coverage. take our poll, which you can find at the bottom of the story. "need to know" on pbs tonight takes a look at our nation's aging infrastructure and its impact on our economy. it's part one of two editions funded by the supporters of the nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy group common good. jeff greenfield reports how the sluggish pace of change threatens our future. >> . >> on may 29th, 1935, two years after they had begun pouring, crews placed the last concrete in hoover dam. this modern civil engineering wonder stood completed, two and one half years ahead of schedule. >> it was the most ambitious public works project in human history. built in the depths of the great depression. to tame the colorado river, created an immense man-made lake, provided the electric power to the california defense plants that helped win world war 12. hoover dam is one of countless examples of the kind of public works that defined america. from the erie canal to the transcontinental railroad, to the interstate highway system. suc
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)